Reporting Status: normal
Wet bulb heat category: White as of 9/2/2014 12:40 PM
Fire danger rating: Green as of 5/12/2014 07:27 AM

The Mountaineer Online



Project Appleseed teaches Soldiers lessons of forefathers


A Soldier in 3rd Brigade Combat Team looks through his scope at his long-distance target during “Project Appleseed” marksmanship training Aug. 19. Soldiers from various battalions learned marksmanship techniques and the history of past Soldiers from volunteer instructors for Project Appleseed. Photo by Spc. Melissa Church.
A Soldier in 3rd Brigade Combat Team looks through his scope at his long-distance target during “Project Appleseed” marksmanship training Aug. 19. Soldiers from various battalions learned marksmanship techniques and the history of past Soldiers from volunteer instructors for Project Appleseed. Photo by Spc. Melissa Church.

Spc. Melissa Church

3rd Brigade Combat Team Journalist

Soldiers of 3rd Brigade Combat Team learned to take the history and techniques of their forefathers and become better fighters when volunteer instructors for Project Appleseed came to Fort Drum on Aug. 17-19.

“Project Appleseed is sponsored by a nonprofit organization, the Revolutionary War Veterans Association,” said Staff Sgt. John Hawes, a marksmanship instructor with Project Appleseed. “We are all volunteers; we use our own time to teach civilians and military marksmanship and the history of the Revolutionary War.”

Instructors at Project Appleseed believe that the core values and history of the nation benefit the country and the Soldiers today.

“We teach the importance of marksmanship (and that) the sacrifices the Soldiers are making (today) are the same as in the Revolutionary War,” Hawes said.

With the belief that history and techniques used in the past can benefit Soldiers today, the class was open to everyone in 3rd BCT who wanted to participate.

“This training teaches us the history of the first Americans and the importance of their accuracy (in combat),” said Staff Sgt. Jonathan Demler, personal security detail noncommissioned officer in charge, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3rd Brigade Combat Team.

Most Soldiers learn how to shoot at maximum distances of 300 meters. Soldiers in the four-day course shoot at 400- and 500-meter targets.

 “(This helps) familiarize Soldiers with long-distance shooting,” Demler said. “We are engaging targets up to 500 meters with just standard weapons. Nearly all the engagements that occur in Afghanistan are at 500 meters and beyond, so it’s important to be accurate.”

To help improve marksmanship, Soldiers learned how to shoot without being supported by any sandbags or rocks, just your weapon’s sling for support. Soldiers also learned how to analyze the shot and how to shoot.

“All we are really doing is bringing back a course of fire our forefathers used,” Hawes said. “One thing that made Americans superior to the British was (marksmanship).”

Not only was the training informative, but beneficial to combat operations.

“The importance of this for the 10th Mountain Division in Afghanistan (is that most of the) engagements are long distance,” Hawes said.





The Mountaineer



Archive

Year:
 




Public Affairs Office
Attn: Fort Drum Mountaineer
10012 South Riva Ridge Loop
Fort Drum NY 13602-5028
Email: drum.pao@conus.army.mil
 
 
This Army Civilian Enterprise Newspaper is an authorized publication for members of the U.S. Army. Contents of the Fort Drum Mountaineer Online are not necessarily the official news of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, Department of the Army, or Fort Drum.